balmes

“You have to take on a perpetual learning mindset. With this mindset nothing is ever painstakingly difficult or defeating, because I perceive every challenge as a potential learning opportunity to grow.”

1. What is your secret to running your own business, teaching, being a huge part of PTAG and your personal life?

The secret…well it’s not really a secret. I think what has helped and driven me in everything I’ve done and what I am doing is to always challenge myself.  I honestly hate plateaus. Feeling comfortable or having a sense of being “done”. I believe that true living in this lifetime is about working towards goals and making a difference in this world, so there’s always work to do. I learned in residency to never think that you’re truly “done” learning”. You have to take on a perpetual learning mindset. With this mindset nothing is ever painstakingly difficult or defeating, because I perceive every challenge as a potential learning opportunity to grow.

2. What do you specialize in at your clinic?

I specialize in working with athletes and their sports injuries. I help them get out pain and injury so that they can compete and workout again without fear of reinjury or compromises to performance.

3. What is the most challenging/rewarding aspect of having your own practice?

Being my own boss and having complete control to make a vision reality. I have a vision of what a practice should be, but making that vision happen have always taken a back seat to someone else’s vision – and that’s fine! All practices represent a vision of the practice’s founder. If you align with that vision then cool. If you don’t…Well then you should consider making your vision a reality.

4. What piece of advice would you give to other PTs that want to start their own practice?

Get really good at the clinical practice side first. Why bother starting a business when you’re not even a good clinician first? Sure you could probably do both when starting out, but I’m skeptical. If you do go and try and do both, developing your clinical skills and business skills, and you make it work…you’re the exception not the rule.

I say this because when you get the clinical side to a more advanced level, you can then focus on the business side. Doing both simultaneously just doesn’t seem ideal- nor good for our patients.

5. We know that you were recently elected for President-elect, and are set to start your duties as President next Fall. What direction would you like to see the organization go in?

I’d like to see PTAGs continued improvement in being relevant to today’s environment and have PTAG bring crazy amounts of value back to our members. Last but not least I’d like to see PTAG strongly invest in developing students to be our future leaders of our profession.

Dr. Ryan Balmes is a sports physical therapist that’s board certified in both sports and orthopedic PT. He is also is a fellow of the American academy of Orthopaedics manual physical therapy. After graduating PT school from the university of Florida in 2011, He finished his Orthopaedics PT residency at Louisiana State University Health in Shreveport LA in 2012. He completed his fellowship in Orthopaedics manual therapy for sports rehab in Seattle, WA in 2013. Dr Balmes’ opened his own practice, ENDVR Sports Physical Therapy in January 2016, helping clients get out of pain and injury so that they can compete and workout again without fear of re-injury or compromises to performance.

If you are interested in finding out more about Dr. Balmes and his business, click the link: https://www.endvrspt.com/